Jobs That Will Disappear in the Next Decade

Jobs That Will Disappear in the Next Decade

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are more than 20 jobs that will be disappearing from the landscape over the next 10 years. These jobs are vanishing because of the rapid advances in technology and the progress of automation of jobs and artificial intelligence. Many careers that provided a good living for your parents and grandparents in the 20th century are not going to be career options for your children moving forward. Here are the top jobs that most researchers think will not be around in 2030.

Travel Agents

Travel Agents

Many people in the 20th century used travel agents to help plan their travel in the United States or around the world. Travel agents had access to all kinds of information about planes, ships, and exciting hotel destinations that would have been impossible for people to find on their own. However, the Internet and electronic payments have changed all that. Most people make their own travel plans via websites, such as Travelocity, Trivago, and Airbnb. While smart travel agents figured this out a few years ago and moved their services online, it is expected that on-site travel agencies will disappear by 2030. People who are interested in travel have been changing to careers in teaching English overseas, as well as travel photography, blogging, or international relations/finance, which are still in-demand careers.

Cashiers and Bank Tellers

First World countries are rapidly moving toward a cashless society, with electronic payments, cashless payments, and cryptocurrencies readily available. It is becoming increasingly rare for people to pay for anything in cash. In addition, payment locations are becoming increasingly automated. For example, people who want fast food can now order through an app and pay online, then either pick it up or have it delivered. This is also eliminating the need for cashiers at fast food restaurants. Many of these restaurants, such as McDonald’s and Burger King, are gradually phasing out cashiers. With the disappearance of cashiers will be the disappearance of bank tellers as well because most people do their banking online. While a few bank locations will continue to exist because people still need loans and other financial information, bank tellers are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.

Librarians

Librarians

Although, in some communities, libraries are loved and supported, in others, libraries have had their funding cut, and that has resulted in the closing of community libraries. Academic libraries are converting their information to digital formats. While librarians serve a vital function as advisors for academic progress toward research, many librarians are losing their jobs with the closing of the libraries.

Postal Couriers

Postal Couriers

Parcel delivery drivers will still be an important part of the landscape for a while, even with the growing use of drones for delivery. Drivers who are used for parcel delivery appear to have a job … for now. However, the traditional postal carriers through the U.S. Post Office seem to be on their way out. While some people still get bills in the mail, increasingly people receive and pay their bills online, which eliminates the need for postal carriers to deliver paper bills. Most researchers believe mail carriers will be phased completely out by 2030.

Printers, Newspapers and Magazine Jobs

Increasingly, jobs that have to do with print are being reduced to compensate for a lack of readership. Many Millennials choose to get their information online. Some of these jobs include publishing, newspaper and magazine reporting and editing, layouts, and photography, and workers who put the papers and magazines out. Printed versions of newspapers and magazines cannot compete with the timeliness of online information. While some of these jobs are being moved online, and there will continue to be work in online media, the age of newspapers and magazines is coming to an end.

Sports Referees and Umpires

Sports Referees and Umpires

Sports referees and umpires have been resoundingly booed and hated for more than 100 years, based on the fans’ versions of their calls. But, now, it appears that the need for referees for games may be decreasing because of an increase in technology. FIFA is looking at a piece of technology called VAR (Video Assistant Referee) to see if it can be adapted for use in its matches and tournaments. It is already being used in some of the top leagues in Europe. Some technology assistance for officials is also being used in WTA and ATP tennis. Other sports, such as cricket and rugby, already use technology to make decisions in real-time during matches. It would appear that it is only a matter of time before the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL – all the major American leagues — will also be incorporating technology and reducing the number of referees over the next 10 years.

Pilots

Pilots

Just as other forms of transportation drivers, such as taxi drivers, Uber and Lyft drivers, and bus drivers, will begin to decrease because of automation and self-driving cars, the need for pilots to fly a plane will also decrease because of the modern aircraft’s capacity to pretty much fly itself. As it stands right now, for much of a flight, the airline stays on autopilot, and the pilot handles takeoffs and landings. In the future, flights will also be able to take off and land without much assistance. In some countries in Asia, pilots are forbidden to land a plane. While a cockpit will most likely have one pilot or supervisor in it as long as people want to fly, there will not be as much need for a team of pilots and officers.

Telemarketers

Telemarketers

This is one job category that many people will not be sorry to see go. Telemarketers are consistently ranked among the most loathsome categories of jobs. It is estimated that in one month alone, customers may receive as many as 250 telemarketing calls, which leads to a flood of complaints from consumers.

However, telemarketers aren’t going away because of annoyance, but because of automation, usually called robocalls. Automation has been able to allow telemarketing companies to make thousands of calls a day. Robocalls usually just hang up when a customer doesn’t answer or they leave messages on answering machines or voicemail, which reduces human interaction time until an actual person answers the telephone. In that case, the automated message is delivered to the unhappy person. Many telemarketing companies, whether they are small (usually playing a little loosely with the rules) or large (doing a volume business), companies are increasingly looking to automation. It eliminates hiring costs and allows the company to call customers all over the world.

Although there are many jobs that are going away before 2030, there are new jobs rapidly appearing on the scene. For example, there is great demand for technically skilled laborers, especially those laborers who are both immersed in technology as well as skilled trades. For example, air conditioning and heating technicians with technology skills are in great demand since air systems are becoming increasingly more automated and complicated. In addition, computer-aided drafters and drafting artists are also in demand since this skill uses both art and technology. As the world becomes increasingly more connected and in need of people to protect consumers, people who have skills in cybersecurity are also increasingly in demand.

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Richard Holmes was born in Tampa, Florida and studied computer science at Pensacola Christian College in Pensacola Florida. A devout Baptist, volunteer Sunday School teacher and online gaming fan, Richard works as a part-time systems administrator at Baptist Hospital and part-time professional blogger specializing in statistics, probability and computer science issues. He is an ardent believer in the future of artificial intelligence as a tool for transforming human society for the better, particularly in the area of health care and modern medicine. A chess player, and competitive online gamer Richard actively participates on online gaming tournaments in his free time.